From ‘Are We There Yet’ To Taking The Wheel: Teaching Your Teen How To Deal With Disaster On The Road

Helping teens get ready to drive involves more than just riding with them a certain number of hours to fulfill learner’s permit requirements for a particular state. Teens who drive need to know how to deal with major as well as minor incidents that arise while they’re behind the wheel. It’s to their advantage to give them the tools they need. From ‘Are We There Yet’ To Taking The Wheel: Teaching Your Teen How To Deal With Disaster On The Road will help adult drivers understand what instruction is necessary.

Give teens a taste of real-time traffic

Driving lessons shouldn’t just take place in a parking lot or on a quiet side street. While this type of driving is necessary when teens are just beginning to get practice behind the wheel, eventually they’ll need to move out into regular traffic conditions. Helping them do that by riding with them during rush hour, at night, and in poor driving conditions is the best way to help them get the valuable experience they need. Don’t stay off the roads when traffic is heavy or weather conditions are bad. Teens will need to know how to drive in a hard rain, fog, and on snow and ice sooner rather than later. It’s best to learn how to do it with an experienced driver alongside.

Teach teens how to deal with emergencies

Sudden and unexpected situations arise on the road that even experienced drivers have a hard time handling. Teens, with less time behind the wheel, may have no idea what to do if a deer runs in front of the car, for example, or if their car hits black ice and goes into a skid. Explaining the best procedures for handling these road emergencies and practicing them as much as feasible before teens get out on the road themselves is the best way to help get them ready. Other emergencies, such as knowing how to drive a manual-transmission car or how to fix a flat on the side of the road are lessons teens can use to help get themselves and their friends out of serious situations

Consult pros if necessary

Parents and other family members responsible for helping teens learn to drive may not feel qualified to provide the instruction teens need to learn how to drive safely. In these cases, qualified individual teachers, school courses, and driving schools may be the best options.

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